What you should know about Climate Change.

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    The International Institute for Environment and Development has published three short papers on climate change. You can download them from the links below.

    Aren’t we all vulnerable: why do vulnerability analysis?

    The idea of ‘vulnerability’ is widely used shorthand for the disproportionate impacts that climate change will have on high-risk groups and fragile ecosystems. Decision makers increasingly want to target adaptation funding to those people and environments most affected by climate change. They must also be able to monitor the effectiveness of their investments. Vulnerability analysis is sometimes presented as the solution to these wants and needs — but existing approaches are often of little use. In this opinion, Marcus Moench suggests that to be truly useful as a basis for dialogue, action and accountability, the meaning of ‘vulnerability’ must be clarified and the methods for analysing it greatly strengthened. This means establishing standard, replicable approaches that differentiate between the roles and exposure of stakeholders, systems and institutions. Download the opinion paper here == http://pubs.iied.org/17110IIED.html?s=SDO&b=d

    Ecology, equity and economics: reframing dryland policy

    Drylands are among the world’s most variable and unpredictable environments. But people here have long learnt how to live with and harness this variability to support sustainable and productive economies, societies and ecosystems. Policymakers have for too long ignored this wealth of experience and expertise with dire consequences. In the face of climate change and increasing uncertainty in the drylands, the need to reframe policy and practice has never been greater. In this opinion, Ced Hesse explains that the future must be built on sound scientific information, local knowledge, informed participation and the wisdom of customary institutions.

    Download the opinion paper here ==http://pubs.iied.org/17106IIED.html?s=SDO&b=d

    Urban adaptation planning: the use and limits of climate science

    Cities face a mounting challenge from climate change. In developed and developing countries alike, rising temperatures, changing rainfall patterns, higher sea levels, and more frequent and severe extreme events such as droughts and floods threaten to overwhelm urban infrastructure, services and management systems. City officials recognise the need to adapt to climate change, and use scientific evidence to support their plans for doing so. But the precise details of these changes and the local impacts they will have cannot be predicted. This briefing explains how decision makers can draw on scientific data while simultaneously managing the uncertainty inherent in future projections, and highlights the forward-looking city officials across the world who are proving themselves to be ‘urban adaptation leaders’

    Download the opinion paper here ==http://pubs.iied.org/17108IIED.html?s=IIEDBRIEF&b=d

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